Whistleblower who complained of ‘egregious deficiencies’ is the ‘wild card’ in Musk’s clash with Twitter

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Last Updated on 3 months by Mukesh

Peiter “Mudge” Zatko, a reputable figure in the cybersecurity community, is a wild card in Elon Musk’s legal ploy to void the $44 billion contract to purchase the social network. 

Musk is trying to persuade a judge that he was tricked when he pushed his unsolicited bid on the firm, and Zatko’s whistleblower complaint about “extreme, egregious deficiencies” in Twitter’s defences against hackers helps him in this endeavour. 

Zatko stated in his testimony before US Congressmen on Tuesday that he decided to come forward due to his concerns for both national security and potential harm to Twitter users.

I didn’t release my whistleblower information to hurt Twitter or get even, claimed Zatko. 

Far from it, I still support the organization’s objective. 

In an October trial in a Delaware court, Twitter has vowed to demonstrate that it did nothing wrong after dismissing 51-year-old Zatko’s lawsuit as being without merit. 

Zatko’s claims might be rendered irrelevant if the court places emphasis on the fact that the richest man in the world neglected to conduct the fact-finding procedures generally connected with high-value transactions.

Back when he was a long-haired hacker determined to raise awareness about the dangers of inadequately secured federal computer systems, Zatko gave his first congressional testimony 24 years ago. 

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This time, he was asked to go into further detail on his claims that Twitter covered up security holes and that it discriminated against accounts controlled by spammers or automated programmes rather than actual people. 

He testified at the hearing that Twitter’s security flaws pose a threat to both national security and user privacy, but that the company’s leadership has resisted making the required but difficult improvements because it places a higher priority on profitability than security. 

The quantity of phoney Twitter accounts has been cited by Musk as one of the justifications for abandoning the April buyout agreement.

(with inputs from agencies)
 

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